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Thread: Homeless

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Grass Valley, CA
    Posts
    3

    Red face Homeless

    We have never allowed tent camping, due to the homeless population in the area. They tend to want to move in. Does anyone else have to deal with this issue? If so, how do you deal with it? We would like to offer tent camping to families to enjoy vacations like I did as a child, but I'm unsure just how to keep it under control. Any suggestions?

  2. #2

    Default tenters

    I do not allow monthly stays in tents because local workers tend to want to camp out in the summer to save money. I have just this year started allowing weekly tent stays. In the past I had a three night max. Time will tell, if weeklies work. you could always set a one night limit, but if families call to make a reservation, you could make exceptions on a case by case basis. Chances are the homeless will not call for reservations or make them online. If you plainly posted rules that would discourage "homesteading" then drop ins would know the rules, and phone in's would not be discouraged.
    Cheryl

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Grass Valley, CA
    Posts
    3

    Default homeless

    I pretty much go case by case for sure! We don't allow monthlies, as events tend to interfere with long stays. I had thought about a 3 night max, but people seem to think they can come in and go out and come in and go out! All of our advertising says No Tent Camping. I have cleaned out the RV's that didn't meet our policy requirements, guess it will just be an ongoing thing. Everyone thinks I'm nuts to allow tents, but I think a true camping adventure is very important to families. That is, if, it is regulated.

  4. #4

    Default tent camping

    We consider ourselves a "high end" camping experience, yet have been able to have tents here with no problem. The most important thing is to have strict, documented rules. We do allow drinking, but we do NOT allow drunkeness. We have a strictly enforced 10 PM quite time. We do not allow clothes lines. We also keep the tents completely separate from the RV's, and do not allow any tents in the RV sites. The few people that we have had to enforce the rules on, don't bother to come back, and the ones that appreciate the rules, and the peace and quiet, come back with their friends. After a few years our tenters often purchase an RV and then keep coming back.
    Cheryl

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Dexter, OR
    Posts
    1

    Default Homeless - Tent Camping - Long Term

    Our park is in Oregon, which restricts camping in an RV or tent to 2 weeks in County and State Parks. We use that rule in our tent area. We don't allow winter tent stays due to the weather. When it's cold and rainy, these guests would want to hang out in the Club House all day. But I did want to comment on the "homeless" title in the original post. As the economics and housing situation worsen, we receive many calls for monthly rate RV sites (as well as tenting). People are forced out of their home for one reason or another, and look at purchasing a minimal cost RV to call their home. But most who have called can't afford the monthly rate + electricity, so don't move in. It's sad, for them of course, but it is also sad for RV Parks that are in business to provide a vacation destination atmosphere.
    Park Manager
    Dexter Shores RV Park
    Dexter, OR
    http://dextershoresrv.com

  6. #6

    Default Tent Camping

    Hello All,
    A portion of our campground is located in a flood plain, thus we have tent camping in that area during low water. Tent camping has a significent impact on our overall income, though, 95% of the problems we endure come from the tenting areas.

    We "limit" the number of nights a tent camper can stay and require that they move their tent every three days. Maximum stay is 2 weeks and we do not allow them to check out and check back in.

    Tents and Pop-Up camping units are not designed for long term camping. A month in the elements and they show their wear. It is also imparative to monitor their sites for accumilations of personal goods. Some people tend to accumilate household items and want to store them at their campsites. If their site becomes "cluttered" we give them the choice to clean it up or move on.

    My comment would be to monitor the sites, give them fair warning before renting to them and all should go well. Besides, with Campground Master, it's easy to flag problem campers and suggest they camp elsewhere should they return. I have told more than one guest to consider camping elsewhere should they decide to camp again....

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